Monday, May 23, 2011

Talent Is Taught

I have a feeling we will have a new generation of instructors in BJJ. The "Talent Is Taught" generation. Who will possibly teach in a way that is more efficient, in tuned with how our brain works, that talent is not something innate or created through conditioning but through concepts and repetition. Maybe educators who decide to teach BJJ, or grad students, or just really smart people.

As there are a new wave of more athletic competitors, there will also be a new wave of more educated BJJ educators.

6 comments:

  1. You are absolutely correct in that assumption. Over the last two years I have started, built, developed, and marketed the kid's program at my academy. When I opened the doors to it two years ago, I had two students who signed up. One of them is still with me. I have a fairly large class now, and we compete quite a bit. My teaching style is nowhere near what how my instructor does it. I have kids from ages 16 down to 8 and they are all in the same class. I show a new technique once during an entire week of training, and we rep it for the entire week. However, a bulk of our time is spent going over the details to the technique we teach, and we spend a ton of time doing repetitions on just the details. I have always had a longing to teach bjj "against the grain". My focus is not on tradition in the academy, it is on maximum retention. I believe that talent and athleticism can be built in anybody if it comes with an attention to detail. Considering a lot of the techniques share the same details. So when the details are down pat, teaching the techniques becomes much easier. You are on to something here. Good post!

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  2. Yes. I don't teach classes but I do teach private lessons. I have clients who train at very good facilities, with black belt instructors with a lot of accomplishments. Who am I? A nobody who just likes to blog. And somehow at the end of the day these guys end up taking the private with me instead of that black belt (they find me through my blog). I think it is because of that teaching method that goes against the grain as you say Rollo. There's a new generation of competitors coming out but I think there will also be a new generation of educators.

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  3. will Charles benefit from this teaching style?

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  4. I also agree. BJJ is so young that it is still extremely disorganized in its pedagogy. It's not uncommon to go from instructor to instructor in a given week and have ABSOLUTELY NOTHING tie together in a way that makes any sense.

    And no concepts whatsoever.

    Again, just a bunch of moves -- you figure out why they work, how to tie them together into something somewhat effective, and forgetting the move a couple of days later.

    Without the proper foundation, no matter how pretty your house is ...

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  5. LOL Daniel you are the only person in BJJ I have ever seen use the term pedagogy. But yes you are correct. Most tend to show a bunch of moves that are only similar in the fact they are all armbars or all from cross side, and really share no other concept other than that, then your instructor tells you to choose a move out of those you like and just work on that. a BJJ salad bar.

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