Saturday, December 10, 2011

Energy Debt

You've been training hard all week. Maybe twice a day a few times. Friday rolls around. One of your buddies comes in, he maybe trains 4 times a week. You feel you have surpassed them. You guys roll, and somehow he smashes you. What happened?

He is coming in the fresher while you are suffering from energy debt. You have spent more energy than you can recover from, and so at this point, your friend comes in with full energy.

Or you have been training super hard for a tournament, even to the final week. You go in and gas out, you are competing while you have energy debt. Or maybe you get a cold or flu because of the energy debt.

Instead of getting into your own head and questioning your skills or heart, it probably comes down to over training instead of optimal training. You can train and do strength and conditioning. But there definitely is an optimum amount to do both.

I think if your body can handle training 6 times a week. Then if you do 1 day of strength and conditioning,  you should only train 4 times unless its only temporarily leading up to something. Now if you can train 12 times a week, if you do strength and conditioning twice, you should only train 9 times. The mistake is people who train 12 times, do not make adjustments to training, just add S & C and train injured or sick all the time.

3 comments:

  1. Well, how does one know how many sessions one's body can handle?

    This is particularly relevant to me since I'm off to Thailand in a couple days to train and obviously my attitude is the gung-ho "I'm gonna train twice a day for 6 days a week and be awesome" but some part of me realizes that may not be a viable or even good approach.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Good post, this is very common in the BJJ world.

    Signed, HBJJ

    ReplyDelete
  3. Terrence the only way you would know is if you kept some kind of training journal and had a written log of how much energy level you felt you had, compared to how often you trained. Then you can use that history to figure out some baseline level or at what number did you train a week before you got injured.

    ReplyDelete

DISCLOSURE

Affiliate links are used and I may receive a commission if you click.

Inner BJJ is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.